Forrest’s Ultimate Shed

Forrest’s Ultimate Shed

Sitting firmly on the back burner was Forrest’s 12′ x 20′ timberframe building for kayak and firewood storage. He updated his progress from time to time with photos.

This shed is available as our Ultimate Shed Shop Prints, so you can make one too!

Longer description below. Click on any picture to see a slideshow of the project.

Ultimate shed - joists for loftFor the loft joists: The slightly larger than nominal 2×6 joists are reduced to 4″ depth, and let in to the bent girt 1″. This is an old timberframing practice, The pockets can be made in advance of the joists, which don’t need to be the correct depth – just reduced to 4″. The joist aren’t weakened at all by this. If forced to a breaking point, it would fail on or near the middle. To illustrate this principle, I usually ask the doubters to imagine breaking a pencil in half. Then, imagine breaking off the last 1/2″.

Last photos: The front doors finally done. The partially installed window is actually a vertical “light ” for a steel entry door. It looked enough like a window to suit my purpose. I’m still working out the flashing detail. It’s not helping that I broke the inside sheet of the thermal pane.

One photo shows a pile of boards and battens stickered and drying a little more. By the time I finished the window they were plenty dry to finish boarding the shed in.

Many old Nova Scotia barns have that long row of single panes over the big main door. That door opens to what was called the “threshing floor”, and cattle and other things were on each side. The threshing floor was usually kept clear, so a wagon (loaded with hay, veggies, etc.) could be brought inside during an emergency, usually a weather event. It was also used for building projects and repairs during the winter. Back to the point – the windows were crucial to let in light when the big door was closed, and it almost always was. My grandfather used to refer to those windows as “lights”.

The shed is used for storing and/or building kayaks, storing firewood, barbecue, mower, etc., and as a workshop — a man cave, if you will.

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